Why Educate Our Kids? Part Four: Audience Behavior

13 06 2010

So today as Spunky started a new conversation about what it means for a child to be “well-educated” I noticed it afresh and thought I’d mention some of what it makes me wonder, about what’s being taught and learned and why to our kids out of school, not in.

The phone number is painted on the glass, too: want your child well-educated in mind, body and spirit all at the same time? Who needs School OR Church? Just call 8-WE-KICK. . .

Y’all know the way our kids are educated out of school and church. One big part of it is musical theatre:

Favorite Daughter at age 17 in her college honors history class, answered a bonus question for a perfect score on the final, that her professor couldn’t figure out how she knew, because it wasn’t in the text of the lecture notes: name all five of the members appointed to write the Declaration of Independence and the colonies each represented in the Congress. So he asked outright what her secret source was, and got a good laugh when she started singing, “But Mr. Adams” from the musical 1776.

See also There is Nothing Sexier Than a Baritone and “How can we learn about our present if we don’t educate people about what happened in our past?””

So when I saw commentary on Helen Thomas having tragically overstayed the audience’s support for her role on the public stage, it spoke to me about everything in America’s power of story:

Botchirng an exit cue in a stage production can result in dramatic disaster, says Sara Freeman, a professor of theater history at the University of Oregon. . . . staying onstage when you are supposed to exit is considered “very bad etiquette or an act of outright aggression or disrespect” in the theater world. . .”and upends planned narrative or visual effects. It distracts attention from what the focus is supposed to be in the story.”

Freeman says she has a million stories of actors who missed their entrance cues, “but missed exits are rarer because they usually have to be chosen. It’s far harder to not exit by accident.”

The Whole Truth and Nothing But the Truth:

I believe we’re in an age where a view of humanity as dark and “herd-like” should not govern . . . I believe we must take the high road by simply telling people the truth about the products, services and issues we represent. That presupposes that we can in good conscience represent nondeceptive, truthful clients. . .

My own view is that manipulating the darker forces of human nature is inappropriate. . . . Here are my Ten Commandments . . . Read the rest of this entry »

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