Blind Pig Homeschoolers and Truffles of Ham

25 03 2011

Even academically indefensible homeschoolers sometimes wind up doing the right thing for the wrong reason or put another way, even a blind pig sniffs out a mouldering truffle now and then (this is a childish play on the man’s last name, get it, get it?)

Either way, if banning Ken Ham for life from churchy corporate-corrupted homeschool conventions is wrong, I don’t wanna be right . . .

Ken Ham, the man behind the Creation Museum and the future Ark Encounter amusement park, has been disinvited from a homeschool convention in Cincinnati next week because he made “ungodly, and mean-spirited” comments about another speaker, according to the convention’s organizers.

Ham also will be excluded from future conventions, according to a statement by Brennan Dean of Great Homeschool Conventions.

Here’s my favorite part though. Guess who Ham’s ungodly and mean-spirited comments were meant to discredit, the man who was also invited to speak and has NOT been banned?

At issue are criticisms by Ham of Peter Enns of the Biologos Foundation, who has said the fall of Adam and Eve can be construed as a symbolic story of Israel’s beginnings, rather than a literal description of human beginnings.

On his blog and in other statements, Ham takes issue with this view and Enns’ homeschool curriculum.

Hallejulah!

On the other hand, neither literal nor symbolic stories apparently taught the right lessons about how we should live, when laws to starve anybody’s children can be bought and sold as truffle-like moral delicacy without causing the pigs behind it to be banned from polite society. For life.

If this seems unusually punitive, that’s because it is. The message these Republican lawmakers want to send is as straightforward as it is callous: if you go on strike, your family should have less access to food.

Once lost in that forest of moral blindness, feeding Ham creationism to the kiddies with public tax dollars while literally starving them of actual meat as a way to enslave their parents, and calling that good government in any kingdom real or imagined, is just icing on their, um, corporate-coveted truffle . . .

Ham is also spearheading attempts to build an amusement park with a life-size replica of Noah’s Ark, which will include dinosaurs on board. The project has won preliminary approval for up to $37 million in state tax incentives.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

21 responses

25 03 2011
Lynn

So, both academically indefensible homeschooling or morally indefensible governance cause children to go hungry. However, (as quoted in the food stamps article) “when you’re waging class (or culture) war, collateral damage is inevitable” — and children make handy targets, you know. 😦

As for Ken Ham, I wouldn’t be too concerned about the ban if I were him. Even the conference organizers were quick to announce that he was excluded solely for his “unkind” manners, not AIG dogma. The market for his “curricula” will probably continue to expand – especially given the current zeal driving conservatives to divert tax funds from public education to private evangelical Christian schools. Add to that profits from his tax-subsidized theme parks and you’ve got Ham eating high on the hog for years to come. 😉

26 03 2011
Crimson Wife

When even Dr. Jay Wile of Apologia is defending Dr. Enns and Susan Wise Bauer, you know that Ken Ham has gone totally off the deep end. Very unprofessional to launch a personal attack on a fellow speaker from the convention podium. Can’t see Jesus of Nazareth condoning that kind of behavior…

26 03 2011
Crimson Wife

After reading the linked article & comments, you neglected to mention the most important provision of the bill: the fact that if the family was eligible for food stamps prior to the strike, they would continue to be eligible for the same level of assistance. They just wouldn’t get a higher level of assistance because of the strike-related drop in income. Which seems fair to me- why should the taxpayer have to provide a greater level of assistance when the decision to stop working was voluntary?

When I quit my last two paid positions to follow my DH cross-country and back, I wasn’t eligible for unemployment insurance because those were considered voluntary terminations. I didn’t *HAVE* to leave those jobs; I *CHOSE* to do so. And those choices have consequences, including not being eligible to receive unemployment benefits.

26 03 2011
JJ

I didn’t “neglect to mention” anything. I didn’t read that into it.

26 03 2011
JJ

And if it’s there, I don’t see why it would be “the most important provision” — I see the most important provision as the radically unjust and illogical attempt to tie a child’s eligibility for food support to the labor negotiations process or lack thereof, of every adult in her family. Unprecedented and in my judgment unfair, no, outrageous. Cruel and unusual. (Can’t see Jesus of Nazareth condoning THAT!)

26 03 2011
JJ

If a child has an adult family member in prison after being adjudicated guilty of felony, does that child’s food support get frozen for the duration? Will anyone dare argue that it should?

Hearing Jean Valjean in my head:
VALJEAN
I stole a loaf of bread.

JAVERT
You robbed a house.

VALJEAN
I broke a window pane.
My sisters child was close to death
And we were starving.

JAVERT
You will starve again
Unless you learn the meaning of the law.

VALJEAN
I know the meaning of those 19 years
A slave of the law.

CHORUS
Look down, look down
You’ll always be a slave
Look down, look down
You’re standing in your grave.

27 03 2011
Nance Confer

Which seems fair to me- why should the taxpayer have to provide a greater level of assistance when the decision to stop working was voluntary?

****Going out on strike is not the same as voluntarily leaving one job for a better job. It is a legal option (still, no matter how many Republicans try to turn back the clock) to try to improve one’s lot in life and not need food stamps. But it is mighty white of the Rs to allow the working poor who were already so underpaid that they qualified for food stamps to continue to eat.

27 03 2011
JJ

Plus this week is the 100th anniversary of the infamous Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, an unseemly time to defend capitalism-run-roughshod over human lives, in idle conversation much less legislation.

“With police assistance, management hired thugs to beat up the striking women.” I just saw that Mole at Culture Kitchen actually once worked in that building and offers us a free history lesson that America really needs right now, if there are still working folks feeding kids left anywhere in America who accept this as fair:

“. . . the richest 10 percent of Americans received an unconscionable 100 percent of the average income growth in the years 2000 to 2007, the most recent extended period of economic expansion.”

Yes, 100%. All of it with nothing shared, and services to the other 90% being cut rather than increased apace with need. So let’s fix the real greedy excess before another moment pretending America’s fairness problem is about children greedy for an excess of food beyond what they should be willing to do without.

27 03 2011
Nance Confer

Here’s a fellow with a kind word for Republicans, even if I can’t find one —

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/22/opinion/22cronon.html?_r=2

27 03 2011
JJ

Lol, which one? Lots of good and kind and smart words for Wisconsinites generally (of either and both parties) though. Good article all around, and I hadn’t seen it yet, so thanks.

And I personally am with him as a post-partisan, on these words!

Perhaps that is why — as a centrist and a lifelong independent — I have found myself returning over the past few weeks to the question posed by the lawyer Joseph N. Welch during the hearings that finally helped bring down another Wisconsin Republican, Joe McCarthy, in 1954: “Have you no sense of decency, sir, at long last? Have you left no sense of decency?”

28 03 2011
Nance Confer

And the answer is a resounding and heartless, “NO!”

29 03 2011
Crimson Wife

According to the BLS, in 2010 (latest statistics I could find), the median wage for union members was $917 per week, or $47,684 per year. Given that the income limit for food stamps is a mere $28,668 for a family of 4, I don’t think too many union families are on food stamps.

Most of the folks I know who are in unionized fields have six figure family incomes. Their kids sure as heck aren’t relying on food stamps…

29 03 2011
JJ

CW, taken with many previous comments, I conclude that you and I have a very similar view (some folks are unjustifiably making too much money and thereby hurting America) but we are looking in opposite directions when we see it!

29 03 2011
JJ

Would you stipulate, or perhaps quarrel with, reports that a very privileged 400 individuals now control almost as much of America’s money as half of America’s 100 MILLION households divide?

Politifact: True
Politifact: Mostly True

Your tax arguments last year centered on defending $250,000 and more per year in family income as not rich. Now you are saying a fraction of that is not poor. No amount is too much for executives, speculators and banksters yet no amount is too little for public schoolteachers, retired public servants on pensions and in need of health care, the working poor, people scammed by for-profit credit card and mortgage schemes into losing everything . . .

Mine center on the need to stop scrabbling down here over magic beans, and storm the Beanstalk up to the clouds where the Thieving Giants sit atop all the wealth of the world.

29 03 2011
JJ

Tim Pawlenty is on Morning Joe today. He just said that private sector unions like coal miners and meat-packers (his dad’s union) really suffered the industrial abuses “back in the day” — back in the day, really? don’t coal miners and their families and communities suffer even now, from industrial abuses? — but that public sector unions such as those Scott Walker is busting in his “ideological grab” (Donny Deutsch quote) deserve what Walker’s doing and need to be gone, because:

“public sector employees have some of the best benefits, the best pay, they’re some of the most coddled employees in the nation, getting a better deal than the people who are paying the bill, namely the taxpayers, and the taxpayers have figured this out, they’re ticked off and they want it changed, and it’s the right thing to do.”

When my mom was a university guidance counselor and I was a precocious teen first learning about group psychology and pathology, personality types etc, I read some of her trade paperbacks so popular at the time, for example, “The Games People Play” — one of the psychological games based on the power of story in our heads from childhood, was called “Let’s You and Him Fight.” Seems like corporate conservatives have been setting up and winning that game for decades.

30 03 2011
Nance Confer

Most of the folks I know who are in unionized fields have six figure family incomes. Their kids sure as heck aren’t relying on food stamps…

So, CW, the wonderful loophole is just useless window dressing.

Easy to nod at being kind when you know it will never apply in the real world.

30 03 2011
JJ

Something from a deep conversation that bears revisiting, invoking satirical author Christopher Moore, after some funny stuff about parents being secretly replaced by government robots:

“. . .a GPS might make a nice gift this Christmas. They’ve certainly come down in price from last year. Do we need a machine that tells us where we are?

Maybe what we need is a machine not to tell us WHERE we are, but WHO we are. Something that would make us look into our hearts and answer questions honestly about what is right and wrong, about what it actually means to be free, and human, and humane. About whether we really want to live up to the values of our faith and our country, not the manipulated dogma of people with a selfish agenda.

We need a machine that tells us what it is to be decent, and kind, and forgiving, and generous, and just, and fair, and humble. And not just a voting machine
(although we can use that until the new thing comes out).

Something cool.

And we need it before they figure out how to work the death beam.”

31 03 2011
JJ

Two HuffPo things just now, the judicial slapdown of Gov Walker’s latest anti-union, anti-middle America power grab, and this from another CEO who thinks that qualifies him to be King:

“Herman Cain has a compelling life story. He worked his way up the corporate ladder to become a successful CEO and later a popular talk-radio host who promoted conservative principles,” [the director of the Heritage Foundation’s Center for Media and Public Policy] said in an email.

His real life experiences in the business world are very relevant given the challenges facing America.

Quite right. His experiences in the business of corporate pizza and corporate radio are very relevant, given that they CREATED the challenges facing America! 😉

31 03 2011
JJ

Another corporate king with political power claiming to be a government reformer while he enriches his own business bottom line. Again.

PUBLIC CORRUPTION EXCLUSIVE: Issa Secured Nearly $1 Million In Earmarks Potentially Benefiting Real Estate That He Owns
As Roll Call reported earlier this month, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) has a history of blending his personal business interests with his work as a member of Congress. . . . more troubling evidence that Issa may have blended his work as a lawmaker with his own business empire.

31 03 2011
JJ

Meanwhile, that’s not the lying and cheating that supposedly conservative, small government lawmakers are concerned with correcting, to make America a better place for us all. Guess what is? Desperate women trying to make their own anguished private family decisions without government interference:

Indiana State Lawmaker: Women Seeking Abortions Could Falsely Claim Rape Or Incest

6 04 2011
Lynn

FWIW, there’s an entire wiki page devoted to Great Homeschool Conventions vs Answers in Genesis
at the Creation History Project. Over the past week, I’ve been getting a little blog traffic to my (3/30/11) silly little post on the topic, which somebody must have added to the list of online commentary on the story.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: